The following is a list of books for anyone interested in studying music.

Violin

Cello

Piano


General Music


What is it?

Practicing for Artistic Success is one of the best “meta methods” for music study. It contains great tips on how to structure your practice time, as well principles to follow during practice.

Who is it for?

Adults who are analytical self-learners, as well as teachers and parents (who can guide children in practice).

What is it?

Note Grouping is a deceptively simple, but very profound approach to conveying thoughts and emotions through music. This is achieved through feeling motion between notes.

Who is it for?

Adults who have a keen interest in music and are particularly interested in musical expression and understanding how music “works”.

What is it?

The Inner Game of Music is a highly inventive book that deals with practical techniques of consciousness, as they apply to music.

Who is it for?

Adults who are self-learners and are seeking new, creative approaches to learning, performing, and practicing.

What is it?

Passionate Practice is an easy-to-read guide to relaxing, focusing, and concentrating with music in practice and performance.

Who is it for?

All adults, and also children (with guided use). Though written for all musicians, the author is a pianist, with an eye for piano.


Violin


What is it?

Suzuki (Book 1) is a wonderful progression of musical pieces, from Twinkle Twinkle Little Star to beautiful, short works by Bach and Schumann.

Who is it for?

Children and some adults who have a focus on classical music. A great starting point.

What is it?

I Can Read Music (Volume 1) is a very systematic method for note reading, a supplement to repertoire books.

Who is it for?

Adults, first learning to read music. Selections can also be helpful for kids.

What is it?

Similar to the Suzuki Book, but with a more gradual layout of shorter pieces, Essential Elements is another great beginner book.

Who is it for?

Essential Elements is a wonderful resource for students of all ages who enjoy quickly progressing from piece to piece.

What is it?

The O’Connor Method is a collection of American folk-based compositions for the beginner, with some theory and improvisation.

Who is it for?

Students of all ages, but particularly adults with an interest in folk styles and improvisation.


Cello


What is it?

Suzuki (Book 1) is a wonderful progression of music, from Twinkle Twinkle Little Star to beautiful, short works by Bach and Schumann.

Who is it for?

Children and some adults who have a focus on classical music. A great starting point.

What is it?

I Can Read Music (Volume 1) is a very systematic method for note reading, a supplement to repertoire books.

Who is it for?

Adults, first learning to read music. Selections can also be helpful for kids.

What is it?

Similar to the Suzuki Book, but with a more gradual layout of shorter pieces, Essential Elements is another great beginner book.

Who is it for?

Essential Elements is a wonderful resource for students of all ages who enjoy quickly progressing from piece to piece.

What is it?

The O’Connor Method is a collection of American folk-based compositions for the beginner, with some theory and improvisation.

Who is it for?

Students of all ages, but particularly adults with an interest in folk styles and improvisation.


Piano


What is it?

Though the Suzuki Method books were first designed for strings, the Suzuki (Book 1) for piano is a great beginner book, full of tuneful music

Who is it for?

Beginners of all ages would benefit, though the very young (age 3 to 5) may be better served by another book first.

What is it?

The Musicolor Method is an innovative approach to teaching children that begins with color notation, rather than standard, leger-line notation.

Who is it for?

Younger children (age 3 to 7) are a great fit for the book. Some older children may also appreciate the visual approach to learning.

For more information on the method, please follow this link:

Musicolor Method

What is it?

Piano Adventures (Primer Level) is a wonderful, well-rounded, engaging book for young beginners.

Who is it for?

The very young (age 3 to 5) love this book. There are other books better suited for older children and adults.

What is it?

Schaum’s Note Spelling (Book 1) is a fun approach to learning note-reading, with a great variety of exercises.

Who is it for?

All ages.

What is it?

Mikrokosmos was written by one of the greatest classical composers of all time, Béla Bartók. The series is a brilliant collection of music, expertly organized to start from the beginning of piano studies.

Who is it for?

All ages, though young children (3-6) may benefit from starting with selections from the Musicolor Method or Piano Adventures first.

What is it?

Alfred’s Adult All-In-One Course is a wonderfully thorough collection of lessons and pieces. It contains a variety of styles and useful theoretical information.

Who is it for?

As the names suggests, it is best suited for adults, though older children and teenagers enjoy the pieces as well.